Why the Indoor Air Quality of Your Home Matters

Indoor air quality simply means the quality of your home’s air—and as you may have guessed, the higher the quality of your indoor air, the better. Poor indoor air quality can be caused by a variety of factors. As a homeowner, it’s important to understand what can have both positive and negative effects on your home’s air quality.

As Americans, we tend to spend most of our time indoors, so it’s crucial to pay attention to the quality of the air we are breathing while in these spaces. Since indoor air is, in effect, a closed system, indoor pollutants can accumulate quickly, and quickly cause problems. Read on to find out more.  

Why Indoor Air Quality Matters

 

Why Indoor Air Quality Matters

Curious to learn more about your home’s heating or cooling system? We’re the very best resource for all your heating and cooling related questions in the Brighton, Colorado area. For more information about your home, IAQ, and—of course—all things HVAC related, be sure to follow our blog and/or like us on facebook for all the latest updates.

Pollen and Mold: What Homeowners Need to Know

Maintaining good indoor air quality, or IAQ, is vital to the health and comfort of you and your family members. Common contaminants like pollen and mold can make your home’s air quality less than ideal, which can cause short and long term health effects if not immediately addressed. Get to know more about pollen and mold, and how you can prevent these airborne pollutants from invading your home.

What You Need to Know About Pollen and Mold

This spring season, arm yourself with all you need to know about pollen and mold. Use the simple guide below to better understand these contaminants:

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Premier Comfort Heating and Air offers a variety of HVAC related services, including indoor air quality solutions. For all of your home comfort needs, give us a call (303) 916-6773.

 

 

4 Tell-Tale Signs You Need to Get an Air Purifier

Do you think that you might need an air purifier? This HVAC device can help you improve your indoor air quality, but not every home needs to invest in an air purifier. Below, is an informative guide that can help you better understand if an air purifier is right for your home comfort needs.

Signs That You Might Need an Air Purifier

If you are experiencing any of the following issues in your home then it may be time to invest in an air purifier:

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If you’re convinced that an air purifier is right for your home, contact us today. We would love to help you find and install the right IAQ products for your home so that you and your family can breathe easier. For more information about indoor air quality, check out our post: Is Your Family at Risk? Learn the Basics About Indoor Air Quality.

Is Your Family at Risk?: Learn the Basics About Indoor Air Quality

Since most of our time is spent inside of buildings, either at work, school or home, the quality of the air we breathe while indoors is pretty essential. This is what is known as “Indoor Air Quality”, and understanding how it can affect your health and that of your loved ones can go far in reducing illness or other concerns due to polluted indoor air. If your home has poor indoor air quality, you may be susceptible to health effects with symptoms that could appear immediately, or long after initial exposure.

Immediate Health Effects of Indoor Air Pollution

Some common immediate health effects that may be caused by indoor air pollution include headaches, fatigue, dizziness, watering or itchy eyes, or a runny nose. Since these symptoms are similar to symptoms of the common cold, it could be difficult to tell whether or not poor indoor air quality is the culprit. If your symptoms improve once you leave your home and return shortly after re-entering your home, you may have an issue with indoor air quality.

Long Term Health Effects of Indoor Air Pollution

On the other hand, you may not see the ill health effects of polluted air until years later, either from a long period of exposure or repeated encounters with the pollutant. Unfortunately, these effects can be much more serious than those similar to a common cold. Long term health effects from poor IAQ can include respiratory problems, cancer, or heart disease. Therefore, it’s advisable to ensure you have good indoor air quality, even if you’re not currently experiencing any noticeable symptoms.

What You Can Do About Indoor Air Pollution

The effects of polluted indoor air can be scary, but you can improve your indoor air quality in several ways. Here’s a few helpful tips:

  • Look for any visible mold or mildew. Do a “sniff test” around your home, particularly in basements, cellars, and other areas where the environment may be moist. If you suspect mold or mildew, take care of it immediately.
  • Get rid of standing water anywhere in your home. Check your home’s humidity levels, and if they are over 50%, you’ll want to get the source of that moisture under control.
  • Test your home for radon. This is a dangerous radioactive gas that many homeowners don’t even realize is a threat, although its presence can cause serious health effects. Outdoor air generally has very low levels of radon, but this substance can build up indoors at unsafe levels.
  • Stop smoking. Smoking is terrible for your health, but it’s also pretty bad for your indoor air quality. Nix the habit and improve the quality of your home’s air as well as your own health.
  • Make sure all fuel burning appliance such as gas stoves or fireplaces are well vented to the outdoors.

At Premier Comfort, we offer a variety of services to our residential clients, including indoor air quality services. Give us a call today if you’re concerned about the IAQ in your home: 303-916-6773

HVAC System Features That Are Essential to Efficiency

Homeowners will hear a lot about HVAC efficiency when dealing with the repair, maintenance, tune-ups, purchase, installation, and replacement of heating and air conditioning systems; but when it comes down to it, what truly constitutes efficiency, and what features are key to an HVAC system’s performance and efficiency? Today we will be looking deeper into HVAC system efficiency, and explaining all of the modern features that work towards higher energy, heating, and cooling efficiency.

HVAC Ductwork Efficiency

Many homeowners do not realize how much the ductwork of your HVAC system plays a role in both high efficiency and a lacking of efficiency. While many of the modern, technical advances in heating and cooling systems that have led to higher efficiency are in-fat housed within the mechanics of the unit itself, many homeowners forget that the most common place in a home or business where energy efficiency and heating and cooling efficiency is lost is within the ductwork.

Think about it – the treated air (warmed or cooled) makes a journey from the central unit to the various rooms and zones in a home. While it is inevitable that the air will lose a few degrees in either direction during this journey, some less insulated ductwork systems or incorrectly sized ducts can a detrimental amount of heated or cooled air, leading to a drastic reduction in efficiency.

Return-Air Efficiency

Another HVAC system feature that many forget about or never even consider when it comes to efficiency is the Return Air feature. A home is more or less hermetically sealed (airtight) space, this means that if you pump air into the space, there must be an equal amount of air leaving that same space, in order to keep the air pressure even and the HVAC system running efficiently. If more air is being pumped into the space than is leaving, you run the risk of breaking seals around ducts, windows, doors and even in the HVAC system itself. Conversely, if more air is leaving into the return-air than is being pumped into the space you will get a slight suctioning effect that drops HVAC efficiency and can be hard on system components.

As you can see, these two components of heating and air conditioning systems may often be forgotten or taken for granted, but they play a strong and integral part in assuring that ALL of your systems components work together in a cohesive strategy for maximum comfort and maximum efficiency.

Want To Have Your Heating Or Cooling Systems Checked For Overall Efficiency?

SCHEDULE YOUR HVAC SYSTEM SERVICE CHECKUP TODAY:

303.916.6773

Carbon Monoxide Leaks in the Workplace: Are You Prepared?

In your business do you rely on a gas- or oil-burning furnace or boiler to provide you with heat during the winter? If you run a restaurant do you use a gas stove?

If the answer is ‘yes’ to either question you need to know all the facts about carbon monoxide leaks.

Causes of Carbon Monoxide Leaks

Carbon monoxide is a colorless, odorless gas produced as a byproduct of fossil fuel combustion. In certain circumstances machines that burn gas or oil may develop leaks that prevent carbon monoxide from being safely diverted, and if poorly ventilated, adjacent indoor spaces become flooded with this gas the consequences could be fatal.

When carbon monoxide leaks from HVAC equipment, the heat exchanger is most frequently the source of the problem. Tiny cracks or fissures can develop that are difficult to spot without a close inspection.

The Health Risks of Carbon Monoxide Leaks

Fortunately carbon monoxide detectors can protect you from danger in most instances (if you burn gas or oil in your place or business they are a must). But low-level leaks that go undetected can cause a host of health troubles, including headaches, fatigue, nausea, dizziness, wooziness, mental confusion and even a loss of consciousness, if building occupants are confined to small spaces with non-existent ventilation.

Such symptoms could affect customers as well as employees, and needless to say even a small carbon monoxide leak could damage your reputation in the community.

Responding to Carbon Monoxide Alerts

Carbon monoxide detectors are standard equipment in business settings with gas- or oil-fired HVAC systems. When a detector goes off it means gas is present in more than trace amounts, and everyone should vacate the premises immediately.

As you depart the building, you should try to open as many doors and windows as you can on the way out. Ideally you would have time to cut the power to your HVAC equipment—and anything else that burns gas or oil—before leaving. But if you’re feeling ill you should just get out as quickly as possible and summon an HVAC service technician to handle that task.

You should contact your HVAC contractor following a carbon monoxide leak in any case, unless the source is of the problem is a different appliance that requires a special type of service.

Carbon Monoxide Leak Prevention

Carbon monoxide detectors should be checked and tested every few months to make sure they’re still in good working order, and professional cleaning services should be hired to clean and clear chimneys and fireplaces on a yearly basis if you rely on them to assist you with ventilation.

Most importantly, furnaces, boilers, stoves and other appliances that burn fossil fuels should be cleaned and inspected annually, and a careful search for micro-damage that can eventually lead to a carbon monoxide leak should be a priority.

Premier Comfort Heating and Air technicians are trained to sniff out and repair potential carbon monoxide management problems before they blossom into anything significant, so if you contract us to perform maintenance on your HVAC equipment you can rest easy knowing we’ll protect you from this risk.

Denver Area Residents Rely on Premier Comfort Heating and Air

Carbon monoxide leaks and other types of mechanical breakdown are almost always preventable—and at Premier Comfort Heating and Air we’re experts at preventing them.

In Denver and surrounding areas Premier Comfort Heating and Air has gained a reputation for efficiency, reliability and professionalism. We invite you to call us to schedule a maintenance visit for your business’s HVAC system today.

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